Stiff Knee

Extension contracture of the knee can result from different causes, but it usually occurs from trauma. The patient is unable to bend the knee to a functional level.

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Trauma will cause adhesions inside the knee, fibrosis, and shortening of the knee ligaments.

There will also be adhesions and shortening of the quadriceps muscles.

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Treatment

Treatment will usually begin with therapy. The first surgical option will include an arthroscopy and the release of any adhesions. The second surgical option that may be considered as a quadricepsplasty (Thompson or Judet) or a combination of treatments.

An example of a combination treatment plan would be a modified Judet quadricepsplasty with the release of the quadriceps muscle from the femur and a release of the adhesions that are located inside the knee.

After surgery the surgeon can usually achieve 90° plus flexion.

Osteonecrosis of the Hip

Osteonecrosis or avascular necrosis of the hip is death of a segment of bone in the femoral head due to disruption of the blood supply. The etiology of this condition is not fully understood. There are several risk factors associated with osteonecrosis of the hip.

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The condition is bilateral in about 80% of the patients. Check the other hip even if it is asymptomatic.

Early diagnosis is important. In early stages of osteonecrosis, a femoral head preserving procedure may be done.  In late stages of osteonecrosis, the femoral head collapses and cannot be saved. The femoral head may need to be replaced.

Obtain AP frog leg lateral views of the hip. The frog leg lateral view will show the crescent sign. MRI is the study of choice especially when the patient has persistent hip pain, radiographs are negative and the diagnosis of osteonecrosis is suspected.

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The Ficat classification is a commonly used system to stage osteonecrosis of the hip.

  • Stage I: normal appearing X-ray. MRI will detect the lesion (changes in the marrow).
  • Stage II: sclerosis and cyst formation
  • Stage III: subchondral fracture. Crescent sign and flattening of the femoral head.

Stage IV: advanced lesions with arthritis, osteophyte formation and loss of the joint space.

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Treatment

For early stages of osteonecrosis of the hip, initial trial of non surgical treatment is usually done. Surgery may be needed if non surgical methods are not successful.

Non-operative treatment includes:

  • Bisphosphonates: may also be used before the femoral head collapses. Still experimental.

Traditional surgical treatment: when the lesion is small, a head preserving procedure can be done.

  • Core decompression for stages I and II: can make a single large hole or multiple holes in the femoral head. It decompresses the head and stimulates a healing response. The lesion is anteriorly and superiorly.
  • Core decompression with bone graft: debride the necrotic area and place the bone graft. Some lace this much bone graft.
  • Traditional fibular graft: is done in younger patients.

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Complications:

  • Donor site pain and leg dysfunction
  • Tibial stress fracture form side the graft is taken.
  • Total hip arthroplasty (cementless cup and stem) or total hip resurfacing. Resurfacing is not commonly used.

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  • Total hip replacement (predictable): is considered to be the traditional procedure for advanced stages of osteonecrosis of the hip.
  • Total hip resurfacing (controversial): need adequate bone stock to support the femoral component. The result is not as good when compared with a patient with osteoarthritis (older group).

 

 

 

Sever’s Disease

Sever’s disease is a common cause of heel pain in children between the ages of 9 and 12 years. The pain is due to calcaneal apophysitis occurring due to repetitive and continuous traction on the calcaneus from the Achilles tendon. The apophysis is not part of a joint and has muscle or tendon attachments. This traction apophysitis may lead to stress fractures, pain and tenderness over the heel.

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Sever’s disease is similar to Osgood-schlatter disease of the tibial tubercle.

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Patients are usually young athletes presenting with heel pain that increases with activities. Upon examination there could be swelling, tenderness, warmth and/or redness on the back of the heel where the Achilles tendon inserts.

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Plain lateral X-rays may show sclerosis or fragmentation of the calcaneal tuberosity. Sclerosis is not specific for this condition.

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Fragmentation of the calcaneal tuberosity on the other hand, is more common in patients with Sever’s disease relative to the general population.

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Remember that Sever’s disease is a clinical diagnosis. X-rays may show other causes of pain such as tumors, fractures, infections or cysts. MRI is not commonly used, but can help rule out calcaneal stress fractures or osteomyelitis.

Sever’s disease is a self-limiting condition that usually resolves with time. Treatment usually consists of NSAID, Achilles tendon stretching exercises, and activity modifications and in severe condition a short leg walking cast can be used.

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome and Diabetes, A Challenging Problem

Approximately 20% of diabetic patients will develop carpal tunnel syndrome. Peripheral neuropathy makes the condition of the carpal tunnel worse. It is suggested that the never that already has established hypoxia caused by diabetes is more vulnerable to local compression. Other mechanisms and explanations are also involved, so it is a difficult diagnosis). Some people believe that patients with diabetic neuropathy will have a high prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome.

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Electrodiagnostic testing (EMG and nerve studies) cannot distinguish patients with clinical carpal tunnel syndrome from patients with diabetic polyneuropathy. The decision to treat these patients should be made independently of the electrodiagnostic findings. When treating the patient, try to figure out the patient’s blood sugar level. There may be difficulty in determining if the blood sugar is under control.

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HBA1C (the glycosylated hemoglobin test) is an important blood test that shows how well the diabetes is being controlled. The test provides an average blood sugar control over the last 2-3 moths. The normal range of hemoglobin A1c is between 4% and 5.6%. When the level is 6.5% or higher, this indicated diabetes. The goal of treatment is to make sure that the patient with diabetes has hemoglobin A1c less than 7%. The higher the levels of Hemoglobin A1c, the higher the risk of developing complications. People should have the test done every three months to check and see that their blood sugar is under control. At least, the test should be done twice a year.

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The difficulty in carpal tunnel syndrome in diabetic patients is the difficulty of diagnosis, the difficulty in determining if the diabetes is being controlled or not, and if there will be surgery needed, will the patient have complications or not.

Patients who develop complications in orthopedics include: diabetics, obese patients, heavy smokers and patients taking blood thinners.

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If the condition is acute or an emergency, we have to do surgery. If the condition is elective, then surgery can wait. If the patient has poor glycemic control, then you probably don’t want to perform elective surgery on the patient such as carpal tunnel release. Remember, elective surgery can wait.

High blood sugar is linked to increased wound complications after surgery. Hemoglobin A1c is used to monitor the patient’s blood sugar level. The higher preoperative Hemoglobin A1c level, the more there is a risk factor for surgical site infection. Elective surgery can be delayed until HBA1c level becomes normal or better. Joint replacement surgery for example is delayed until HBA1c levels are less than 7%.

Since carpal tunnel syndrome is common in patients with diabetes, we need to take time to sort things out with these conditions. We need to know that the patient has better control of their diabetes. Carpal tunnel syndromes is a small surgery, but it can have catastrophic effect if we do not have a good control of the patient’s diabetes. Hemoglobin A1c will help us monitor the patient. Carpal tunnel surgery can cause complications and infection providing that high levels of HBA1c levels is a true risk factor for infection postoperatively.

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